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June 22, 2009
Posted: 1612 GMT

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June 19, 2009
Posted: 1834 GMT

Hello everyone,

The Supreme Leader of Iran, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, didn't leave room for doubt or interpretation in anyone's minds when he lead Friday prayers in Tehran today.

There was no vote rigging, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad won a "decisive" victory in the country's disputed presidential election last week and protestors have been warned to stop demonstrating, the Ayatollh told supporters in the Iranian capital.

We will bring you part of an interview I conducted with our Tehran reporter Reza Sayah and will take you live around the world for reaction to what is happening in Iran.

Just a reminder to all who've been asking, the reason we cannot be live in Iran at the top of the hour is because CNN has been limited by the government to one report per day. We recorded the exchange I had with Reza earlier and will bring a portion os that back to our viewers at the Idesk.

Also today, we'll explore the drama unfolding in Formula 1, with several top teams threatening to launch a rival F1 league. What will happen to the multi-billion dollar business of high-speed car racing? Take part in our Idesk poll on the topic.

We'll bring you reports on the Iphone launch and breaking news from the world of tennis: Rafael Nadal has pulled out of Wimbledon, presumably because of the knee issues he's been having.

See you on TV!

Hala

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Posted: 1528 GMT

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June 18, 2009
Posted: 1845 GMT

Hello everyone,

Regardless of whether the protests lead to concrete change within the Iranian regime, it is now obvious that what is happening today in Tehran will be seen as a key moment in post-revolutionary Iran.

We will be crossing live to Tehran to speak with an American University professor of Iranian origin, currently in the country's capital. In one newspaper piece, Babak Rahimi wrote that witnessing the mass rallies in Tehran made it "hard not to think of the 1979 revolution."

Don't forget to tweet me questions for professor Rahimi @halagorani and I will choose one to put to him live on air.

We'll be covering the story from every angle, including chatting with our Ivan Watson, who's reported from Iran numerous times and is passing through the CNN Center for a few days.

Also in the show today, the story of a Continental Airlines pilot who died in the cockpit of a plane en route to Newark from Brussels.

Two first officers and a relief pilot were on board and took over. A doctor on board told reporters the pilot was already deceased by the time he got to him at the front of the plane.

Allan Chernoff will be joining us live on that story.

On the lighter side of things, Errol Barnett and I will be trying out a new website that claims to be able to help users make decisions and find solution to everyday problems. I'll be trying it out on air so the site will be put to the ultimate live test.

See you on TV,

Hala

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Posted: 1555 GMT

This is a story that seems to have everyone talking. So, today, we've decided not to post an "I-Desk Online Poll." Instead, we want to hear from you... Post your comments here, and we'll share some of them during I-Desk.

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June 17, 2009
Posted: 1821 GMT

Hello everyone,

Iran is once again at the top of the show today. Rallies for and against President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad continue on the streets of Tehran and the story that has divided the country continues to have worldwide ripple effects.

We will go live to Tehran for the latest on the demonstrations, as well as the restrictions the Iranian government is placing on our reporters in the Iranian capital.

Because the online element angle of the story is still so important, we will be crosing over to our newly established "Iran Desk" for the latest on how information is seeping out of Iran on social networking and video-sharing websites.

Also today, we're looking at some very worrying economic indicators coming out of the United Kingdom. Any hope of a quick recovery is fading fast because jobless figures continue to show that the world economy is hemmorrhaging jobs at a rapid pace.

The situation has gotten so bad that airline British Airways is asking some of its employees to work for free for a month, to try to help the company bounce back from some disastrous results.

BA's CEO Willie Walsh says he'll work for nothing in July. Now forgive me if that makes me smile. Willie Walsh earns $1 million a year plus bonus. If he wanted his sacrifice to equal that of an employee living paycheck to paycheck, it's not a month he'd have to forfeit, but an entire year's salary.

So we're asking you to take part in our daily poll: would you work for free if it could help save your job? We'll read out results and comments on the show.

Must run to get ready for the top of the hour.

See you on TV,

Hala

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Posted: 1513 GMT

British Airways is offering some of its employees a four-week unpaid leave, with the option to work. What would you do?

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June 16, 2009
Posted: 1742 GMT

Hello everyone,

Yesterday, some of you obejected to my use of the term "Twitter revolution" to describe what is happening in parts of Iran right now. A few found it limiting and felt it didn't acurately reflect the wide nature of the protests and rallies that have divided segments of the Iranian population.

The term, widely circulated in the days following Iran's contentious presidential race, is not meant to reduce the political crisis to what can be tweeted in 140 character messages, but to signal the beginning of a new threat to regimes who try to suppress their citizens' messages of protest.

Governments can only control so much; messages and photos of what is happening in iran, circulated via Twitter, have made their way out. They've provided a certain measure of insight into what is happening in Iran today when added to other forms of reporting and newsgathering.

Ok, now that's out of the way, a quick note on actually reporting the Iran story. CNN's Reza Sayah is in Tehran for us today but, like other members of the foreign press, is barred from covering rallies on the streets of Tehran. So he will be live for us from another location.

We'll also be analyzing the aftermath of the presidential election with an Mahmoud Ahmadinejad supporter, Kaveh Afrasiabi, and will ask him at least one question submitted to my Twitter oage (@halagorani.) Thanks for all your suggestions.

Also today, we'll look at President' Obama's latest remarks on North Korea. He is hosting his South Korean counterpart at the White House today and answered reporter questions about the North, stating that he believed a nuclear-armed Pyogyang posed a "greave threat" to the world. We'll analyze the U.S. President's remarks.

We are still looking into reports that three Western tourists recently kidnapped Yemen were murdered and will discuss efforts to get the remaining hostages freed.

And a look at why stock markets are still feeling deflated, despite good economic news.

That, ans the rest of the day's top stories, as awlays.

See you on TV!

Hala

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Posted: 1421 GMT

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June 15, 2009
Posted: 1610 GMT

iran

Hello everyone,

Topping our rundown today, the continuing aftermath of the presidential election in Iran.

Certain parts of the Iranian capital saw violent demonstrations, especially in student areas and in and around Tehran University. And rallies in support of the deeply polarizing Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has claimed victory in Friday's election, and his main rival, MirHossein Moussavi and his supporters, have intensified the bitter political acrimony across the country.

The country's real leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, issued a text supporting Ahamdinejad's win so quicly, it led some experts like Amir Taheri, writing in the Wall Street Journal today, to suggest that the country's "military security elite" is now really in charge of the Iranian state, and exerted some influence over the Ayatollah to support their protege.

Others say Ayatollah Khameini acted quickly because he too saw a candidate like Moussavi as a threat to the establishment.

Either way, the crisis in Iranian has created convulsions in a country of more than 65 million people, the vast majority of whom are under the age of 35, that have spread around the world in large part because of the pictures and messages that slipped through the security net via websites, blogs, and social networking sites like Twitter.

We'll explore that angle of the story as well and take you to Tehran, where our chief International Correspondent Christiane Amanpour is covering the story.

Also today, we'll cover the apparent execution of Western tourists in Yemen, a very worrying development in a country where hostages held by anti-government groups are usually bartered for favors, not murdered. We have live reaction to the news.

And the continuing reaction to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech on his vision for a Palestinian state. Critics say that by supporting a Palestinian nation with no control of its own airspace, borders and no military is in effect support for a "ghetto" state.

That, and the rest of the day's top stories, as always.

See you on TV,

Hala

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International Desk brings viewers into the heart of the largest news gathering operation in the world. Viewers don't come here to watch the news; they come here to be immersed in it. To feel the rush of being the first to know what's happening as stories break, and to leave knowing they've gotten the best and latest information available. The show airs Mon-Fri at 1900 CET.

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