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March 4, 2009
Posted: 1505 GMT

Filed under: Darfur •I-Desk Poll


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Jude Agho   March 4th, 2009 5:24 pm ET

I don't think the ICC is fair in its claim over Sudan.We need to understand that although the geopolitical front is different from Iraq they are similar.ICC could only be fair if it issues a similar arrest warrant to former US president George Bush.I believe civil crisis especially in Africa are quick to be notice and sanctioned as war crimes or genocides while those in other parts of the world perpetrated by western leaders are rather seen as liberation movements.The definition of the functions of the ICC are rather bias especially in their implementation.Africa will always remain an ill treated ,easily blamed continents if there are no movements in the direction of proper and positive reforms.

danny   March 4th, 2009 5:34 pm ET

I do think is right for arrest warrant,but justice should prevail to every head of states around the world not just on some.
Danny

Muhsin Banmili   March 4th, 2009 5:41 pm ET

Minorities must be protected in the world. Crimes against humanitiy must not be allowed in any circumstances. We all remember what happened to the Kurds of Iraq and the atrocities committed against them by Saddam Hussein because of the silence of the world and the ICC. The world should learn from the history of the Kurds.
Muhsin Banmili
Stockholm – Sweden

Gizew   March 4th, 2009 5:52 pm ET

ICC took the right decision eventhough it is too late for the people of Darfuur.

It is obvious and expected to see the African dictotor leaders to support each other and oppose this ICC decision.

If civilized people should care for the life of the poor Darfuur and African people in general, this is a good lesson to teach the dictators and to stop the mass suffering of the civilians and defenceless people.

Gizew, Belguim

Chile Eboe-Osuji   March 4th, 2009 5:57 pm ET

It was extremely crass and shallow for Robyn Curnow to have alleged that the resistance of African leaders to Bashir's arrest warrant is motivated by an old boys club scheming to protect one another. Her argument is not at all aided by her citation of Archbishop Tutu's NYT op ed piece arguing that justice must come first before security.

It was not too long ago that Tutu presided over a South African Truth and Reconciliation Committee, which was founded on the very thesis that security in South Africa must come first, before justice. Apparently, African leaders are now saying that what was good for South Africa then is good for Sudan now. Secure Sudan first; and pursue justice later.

Curnow's allegation that African leaders just want to protect one another is a rather thoughtless allegation. It forgets that African leaders were the ones who put former Chad leader Hissen Habre on trial for crimes against humanity, and they did not protect former Liberian leader Charles Taylor who is now standing trial at The Hague.

African leaders do not support Omar Bshir. But there is an elephant in the room that is bothering African leaders and a majority of their citizens. It is this: Are George Bush, Tony Blair (in Iraq) and Ehud Olmert (in Lebanon and Gaza strip) any less deserving of war crimes charges than Omar Bashir? Curnow somehow ignored that angle to the issue.

Regards.

Chile from Arusha, Tanzania.

Stanly   March 4th, 2009 5:57 pm ET

I specifically wanna say that ICC is an agent set by the west to continue their attact on african continent, because they understand that the rule of colonialism is over...
Now, what they try to do now is to keep those in dafur in hunger for the rest of their life....
God will proof all our attitude.
Stanly

Enock   March 4th, 2009 6:01 pm ET

The move against Sudanese President gives such a relief to all who care about humanity. Iraq and Sudan don’t have much of a difference in their culture and beliefs. My only concern is how practical and thoughtful the move is. We wouldn’t want to see the same mistake US made in Iraq repeat itself in Sudan. We also shouldn’t have double standards in defining crimes against humanity.

Enock

Enock   March 4th, 2009 6:04 pm ET

The move against Sudanese President gives such a relief to all who care about humanity. Iraq and Sudan don’t have much of a difference in their culture and beliefs. My only concern is how practical and thoughtful the move is. We wouldn’t want to see the same mistake US made in Iraq repeat itself in Sudan. We also shouldn’t have double standards in defining crimes against humanity.

Enock – The Netherlands

Thot   March 9th, 2009 9:59 pm ET

Africa has faced many natural obstacles that have worsened life situations there. But Africa is still a place that offers so many opportunities, but yet most of their leaders follow a path that won’t allow their country and people to explore and enjoy what they have best.
No wonder that many leaders do not promote education. An ignorant nation is more easy to shape than one where knowledge and information is common and easy to get.
When we see African countries like, for example, Zimbabwe or Sudan, we could easily refer to many other countries in the world whose people face the same situations and whose leaders follow a self-centered and authoritative path.
I was born in an African country and it saddens me to witness all these events and situations.

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